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Lowenstein Sandler LLP

Anthony W. Raymundo

Anthony W. Raymundo

Partner

Lowenstein Sandler LLP
California, U.S.A.

tel: 650.433.5572
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Local Time: Sat. 09:45

Profile

Anthony is a venture lawyer who takes a collaborative approach with clients. A partner in Lowenstein Sandler's Tech Group, he counsels startups, early-stage companies, growth companies, and venture funds on corporate transactions. Clients benefit from his experience working closely with a host of other startups across their life cycles, from creation to operational matters and through exit. Anthony also has negotiated numerous venture financings and is adept at navigating mergers and acquisitions.

Anthony is well-equipped to handle technical issues and complex challenges that arise in the course of deals. At the same time, he is mindful that his clients' goals often require crafting practical solutions that are efficient and fit within business needs.

Bar Admissions

    California

Education

Stanford Law School (J.D. 2004)
Texas A&M University (B.A. 1999), magna cum laude
Areas of Practice
Professional Career

Significant Accomplishments

Represented Andreessen Horowitz in its investment in Zulily, an online daily deal site for moms and kids, as part of an $85 million Series D financing.

Represented Condé Nast Publications in its investment in Rent the Runway, an online luxury fashion rental site, as part of a $20 million Series C financing.

Represented Savored, a restaurant industry yield management solution, in its sale to Groupon.

Represented Duetto Research, a travel industry revenue management solution, in its formation, general corporate needs, and fundraising efforts, most recently a $10 million Series A financing led by Battery Ventures and Altimeter Capital.

Represented Trinity Ventures in its investment in DotLoop, an online real estate transaction platform, as part of a $7 million Series A financing.

Represented Sequoia Capital in its investment in Houzz, an online platform for home remodeling and design, as part of an $11.6 million Series B financing.

Represented LiftDNA, a yield-optimization platform for online publishers, in its sale to OpenX, a provider of digital and mobile advertising technology products and services.

Represented VigLink, an online link monetization platform, in its acquisition of DrivingRevenue, an affiliate-marketing solution, and in its fundraising efforts, most recently a $5.4 million Series B financing led by Emergence Capital.

Represented nRelate, a developer of tools for online publishers to increase traffic and revenues, in its sale to Ask.com, an online search engine that is a division of the media conglomerate IAC.

Represented MedPage Today, a provider of online medical news, in its sale to Everyday Health, a provider of online health solutions.

Speaking Engagements

The Tech Group will co-host its next VentureCrushATX with Shasta Ventures and Capital Factory. The topic for this program is “Bridging the Physical and Digital World” with panel discussions on AR & Computer Vision and Blockchains & ICOs. The speaker line up will be announced soon.


VentureCrushATX, based in Austin, TX, is a series that features networking, panels and small group sessions with VCs, angels, startups and others in the tech industry.


Articles

Startup and growth company employees in California rest easy knowing that California believes so strongly in the portability of employment that post-termination noncompetes are generally void, except for a few exceptions as referenced below (especially in the context of noncompetes connected to a sale of a business). That comfort has extended to post-employment nonsolicits, which the California courts have viewed as veiled noncompetes. However, just over a week ago, on September 7, a federal district court in California seems to have strayed from this path. This article briefly explores that recent case, Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC v. Rocine, et al.and the seemingly unanswered questions it raises regarding what employers and employees can expect from post-termination nonsolicits in the Golden State.

A new M&A buzzword, the “acqui-hire,” reflects competition for talent through acquisitions in today’s hot technology market. In an “acqui-hire” the buyer is motivated primarily by the talent of the seller’s employees rather than by its operating business or technology — which may still be under development.


Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, in an often-repeated quote, told a 2010 audience that “Facebook has not once bought a company for the company itself. We buy companies to get excellent people.” During the past three years, which have been characterized by rapid change in the technology industry and the explosive growth of new household names in social media and cloud computing, large-cap public companies and venture-backed companies alike have competed to amass critical talent. Recent examples of talent-driven transactions include Twitter’s acquisitions of Summify in January 2012 and Posterous in March 2012, Google’s acquisitions of Milk in March 2012 and RestEngine in May 2012, Zynga’s acquisitions of area/code in January 2011 and Buzz Monkey in June 2012, Groupon’s acquisition of ditto.me in April 2012, LinkedIn’s acquisition of IndexTank in October 2011, and Facebook’s acquisitions of Lightbox and Glancee, both in May 2012.


WSG's members are independent firms and are not affiliated in the joint practice of professional services. Each member exercises its own individual judgments on all client matters.

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