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A&L Goodbody LLP | October 2005

Commentators have argued that the effect of this legislation is to force employers to recognise trade unions against their will as there appears to have been a move away from the traditional voluntarist approach to negotiations with trade unions towards a compulsory approach ...

A&L Goodbody LLP | October 2005

Many employers have been in the potentially tricky and somewhat uncomfortable situation of having to withdraw an offer of employment before commencement. The ordinary principles of contract law apply here. Where an employer withdraws an offer, especially after formal acceptance, a breach of contract claim could arise, at least in theory ...

A&L Goodbody LLP | October 2005

The European Court of Justice has issued an important ruling which could have significant consequences for employers who operate occupational sick pay schemes. In the decision of McKenna v ...

A&L Goodbody LLP | October 2005

Disciplinary investigations are becoming a minefield for employers, particularly where dismissal is a real likelihood ...

A&L Goodbody LLP | October 2005

Until recently, employers in Ireland were only obliged to consult with employees in very limited circumstances, such as collective redundancies and transfer of undertakings. Those obligations will remain intact, however the provisions of the Employees (Provision of Information and Consultation) Bill 2005, will provide employees in undertakings of at least 50 employees with the right to information and consultation in the workplace on a greater number of issues ...

A&L Goodbody LLP | October 2005

Secretary of State for Trade and Industry v (i) Christopher McKinley Swan (ii) Vuchuru Sadhana Reddy (iii) Brian Christopher Ritchie (iv) Brian Samuel North (v) Ian Stewart, [2005] EWHC603(CH) In this English decision the High Court held that the directors of the parent company should have known that its subsidiary companies had been involved in cheque kiting (a process designed to generate fictitious funds through the transfer of cheques between the bank account of two groups of companies) a

British industry is undergoing a period of unprecedented regulatory reform as part of a government drive to reduce the costs and burdens on business. Over the next year, it will become clearer how effective this reform will be. Following independent recommendations from the Hampton Review and the Better Regulation Task Force (BRTF), Chancellor Gordon Brown launched the Better Regulation Action Plan in May 2005 with the aim of boosting flexibility and enterprise ...

A&L Goodbody LLP | October 2005

In the Matter of Flightlease Ireland Limited (In Voluntary Liquidation) and in the Matter of the Companies Acts 1963 to 2003 and in the Matter of an Application for Directions Pursuant to Section 280 of the Companies Act 1963, unreported High Court, 27 July 2005 Background: Flightlease Ireland Limited (Flightlease), a Swissair holding company, was declared insolvent, and an arrangement was put in place with Societe d’Explotiation OAM Air Liberte (Air Lib) whereby Air Lib’s holding company wou

A&L Goodbody LLP | October 2005

New legislation implementing the EU Market Abuse Directive (Directive 2003/6/EC) came into effect in Ireland and a number of other EU Member States last July. The legislation has brought about important changes for all companies (Irish or foreign) whose shares are traded on the Official List of the Irish Stock Exchange (ISE), as well as their directors, senior management and advisers ...

A&L Goodbody LLP | October 2005

National Westminster Bank plc v Spectrum Plus Limited and Others [2005] UKHL 41 Overruling the 25-year old judgement in Siebe Gorman & Co. Limited v Barclays Bank Limited [1979 2 Lloyd’s LR142], the House of Lords has held that a charge over book debts where the chargor is free to draw on the account into which proceeds of such book debts are paid, creates a floating charge, rather than a fixed charge ...

PLMJ | October 2005

This Newsletter approaches several issues, in a general and simple manner that the format requires, which we consider may be of interest to businessmen and companies, with the purpose to inform them or even to challenge them to new forms of organisation and development of their businesses ...

Shepherd and Wedderburn LLP | September 2005

The last thing any tenant wants to face is a costly bill for repairs to their rented commercial property. That is why many potential occupiers seek to include some exclusion on the repairing clause, protecting them from what is an otherwise onerous obligation. While this is the primary means of limiting liability, other options also exist ...

Shepherd and Wedderburn LLP | September 2005

Businesses in the UK are often willing to spend substantial sums of money on acquiring robust protection for their patents, trade marks and other intellectual property. Assets such as these help to set apart one business from its competitors. However, businesses have traditionally been less inclined to spend money on taking court action against competitors that infringe their intellectual property ...

Shepherd and Wedderburn LLP | September 2005

The simplest way of achieving your objective might be to consider the introduction of a share option scheme – this would enable your company to grant its employees rights to acquire shares at a pre-determined point in the future (i.e. on the occurrence of a flotation), but at a price which is fixed when the options are awarded ...

Shepherd and Wedderburn LLP | September 2005

At the end of June, the US entertainment industry won a long fought victory to help bring file swappers to heel ...

Shepherd and Wedderburn LLP | September 2005

The European Parliament dealt a blow to programmers seeking clarity on the patentability of computer-implemented inventions last month when it rejected a draft European Directive on the subject (the "CII Directive") by an overwhelming majority ...

A&L Goodbody LLP | September 2005

The Safety Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005 has come into effect today, 1 September 2005. Important issues raised by the Act include: 1. A competent person must be employed to manage safety in the workplace; 2. Hazards must be identified and risk assessments carried out which are thorough and reviewed on a regular basis, and this must be communicated to employees regularly; 3. Training has to be relevant and understood ...

PLMJ | September 2005

The telecommunications sector is nowadays one of those sectors in which its regulation assumes a larger presence and visibility at a national level, as well as at European and international levels. In fact, rare is the week – if not the day – when agents of the sector are not confronted with the adoption, by the different regulatory authorities of the sector, of decisions that have a significant impact for the activity undertaken by telecommunications operators and for market conditions ...

After a prolonged period of development, the announcement in August of the Board of Directors for Scotland's Futures Forum has finally seen this body come to fruition. The development of the Forum has included a substantial period of investigating overseas models, canvassing MSPs and running a conference involving 140 representatives from a number of sectors ...

A&L Goodbody LLP | August 2005

Infiniteland Limited v Artisan Contracting [2005] EWCA Civ 758 This English case highlights some vital principles to be considered when drafting share purchase agreements, carrying out and reviewing due diligence and disclosing against warranties ...

A&L Goodbody LLP | August 2005

The Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act, 2005 was signed into law by the President on the 1 July. It will not come into force, however, until the 1 September. The new Act makes it easier to impose criminal liability on directors, managers, and other similar officers who control the operations of employers. It increases the penalties in the District Court and the maximum fine in the Circuit Court is €3,000,000 ...

A&L Goodbody LLP | August 2005

Hidden Ireland Heritage Holidays Ltd. (t/a The Hidden Ireland Association) v Indigo Services Ltd. and Colclough and Gardner, Supreme Court, 7th June 2005 Facts: The plaintiff’s business consisted of booking country homes for its members. The second defendant, Colcough, acted as secretary to the plaintiff from 1986 to 1996. The plaintiff’s principal claim was that the second defendant diverted business to his own competing business with the assistance of the first defendant, Indigo Services ...

A&L Goodbody LLP | August 2005

This Bill (as initiated), which will transpose the EU Information and Consultation Directive, has just been published. It does not give workers an automatic right to information and consultation. Instead negotiations to set up an information and consultation structure will have to be “triggered” by workers themselves in the form of a written request from 10% of the workforce, subject to a minimum of 15 employees and a maximum of a 100 ...

News that London had won the race to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012 was greeted with delight not only in sporting circles, but also in many commercial ones. Businesses up and down the country rubbed their hands with glee at the thought of a raft of new and exciting commercial opportunities. Importantly, these opportunities are not just the preserve of businesses south of the border, but are also available to Scottish businesses ...

One of the functions of Companies House is to make information filed with it available to the public. Staff at Companies House do not question the validity or accuracy of the documents filed and this combined with the ability to freely obtain company details from Companies House can lead to potential fraudsters "stealing" or hijacking a company's identity. Such a fraud took place in 2004 when Companies House forms were, without the company in question's knowledge, lodged by X, a fraudster ...

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