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Lavery Lawyers | March 2008

Every day, and several times a day, we enter into contracts without knowing it or without considering and controlling their effects. This bulletin provides a brief and non-exhaustive summary to help you better understand, prepare for and monitor your contractual environment ...

Lavery Lawyers | July 2016

After the hospitality sector, transportation of passengers and corporate financing, insurance could be the next sector to see its business model influenced by the sharing economy. In the past few years, numerous start-up companies have launched businesses in "peer-to-peer" ("P2P") insurance on risksharing platforms, claiming to reduce bureaucracy and costs, and insure risks not covered by the traditional markets ...

Lavery Lawyers | May 2016

Last May 2, the Court of Appeal granted a motion to dismiss an appeal against a significant decision in the area of civil liability in the context of the practice of a sport.1Decision at trial2 The facts in the case date back to October 3, 2010. A few seconds after the start of a hockey game between two junior teams, the plaintiff, Andrew Zaccardo, was violently body checked from behind by the defendant Ludovic Gauvreau-Beaupré, a player on the opposing team ...

Lavery Lawyers | June 2022

Québec has passed and enacted Bill 96, also known as An Act respecting French, the official and common language of Québec, a major reform to its Charter of the French Language ...

Lavery Lawyers | February 2015

On January 13, 2015, New Mex Canada Inc. ("New Mex"), an Ontario corporation and employer in that same province, was sentenced to pay a fine of $250,000 while two of its officers each received 25-day prison terms after pleading guilty to several offences under the Ontario occupational health and safety legislation and regulations. The proceedings were instituted following a workplace accident in which a worker died after a fall ...

Lavery Lawyers | May 2012

The notion of insurable interest is funa mental to insurance law as it is at the very heart of the validity of this contract. The lack of insurable interest leads to the nillity of the insurance policy and justifies the insurer's refusal to indemnify its insured1. In a decision rendered on March 2, 2012, the Court of Appeal upheld a judgment of the Superior Court2, where an insurer refused to indemnify the insured, raising its lack of interest in the property3 ...

Lavery Lawyers | March 2010

FACTS Mr. Gibbens, the insured, became a paraplegic following an inflammation of his spinal cord. This inflammation was caused by the herpes HSV-2 virus, contracted during unprotected sexual intercourse with three different women in January and February 2003. A diagnosis of viral infection was confirmed on February 17, 2003. Mr. Gibbens’s condition deteriorated rapidly and, on February 23, 2003, he became paraplegic ...

Lavery Lawyers | March 2022

Over the years, the Quebec courts have repeatedly stated that dismissed employees have a duty to mitigate the damages they suffer as a result of a dismissal. This obligation, which is now codified in the Civil Code of Québec,1 has been adapted to the circumstances of the cases over which the courts have presided. The question, then, is whether the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to have an impact on a dismissed employee?s obligation to mitigate damages ...

Lavery Lawyers | December 2021

Ransomware has wreaked so much havoc in recent years that many people forget about other cybersecurity risks. For some, not storing personal information makes them feeling immune to hackers and cyber incidents. For others, as long as their computers are woring, they do not feel exposed to no malware. Unfortunately, the reality is quite different ...

Lavery Lawyers | April 2013

The production and circulation of counterfeit products have been an economic and social problem for some time. Not only can such products pose a safety risk to consumers who use them, counterfeit products also lead to considerable lost income for legitimate businesses, decrease consumer confidence in the marketplace and are often used to finance organized crime. The retail value of counterfeit goods seized by the RCMP increased from $7.6 million in 2005 to $38 million in 2012 ...

Lavery Lawyers | December 2008

On May 22, 2008, the Supreme Court of Canada rendered its decision in a case involving the notion of reasonable foreseeability in negligence actions. This judgment, written by the Chief Justice, confirms that tort law must compensate harm done on the basis of reasonable foresight, and must not be considered as insurance ...

Lavery Lawyers | February 2010

With regard to the professional obligations of a lawyer, is it possible outside the physical confines of the tribunal to let a judge know exactly what he thinks of him? Should the response be negative, does it not unduly restrain his right to freedom of expression otherwise guaranteed to all by virtue of the charters of rights and freedoms? This is the question to which the Court of Appeal had to respond recently by rendering judgment in the case of Doré v ...

Lavery Lawyers | March 2005

Introduction: A Second Union is a “Marriage” of Competing Interests As a general rule, individuals who enter into a second marriage or a second union are more than 40 years of age, have accumulated their own property and have enjoyed a standard of living that they want to maintain or even improve upon ...

Lavery Lawyers | September 2015

On August 18, 2015, the Tribunal administratif du Québec (TAQ) confirmed the decision of a health institution to not renew the status and privileges of one of its physicians after he refused to undergo refresher training to acquire skills that were necessary to perform his new duties.1 The physician in question, a hematology specialist, had been hired as a researcher several years ago ...

Lavery Lawyers | August 2014

This decision of the Superior Court of Québec addresses a pregnant worker’s right to preventive withdrawal where said worker is employed by a business under federal jurisdiction.1 In this case, questions of constitutional jurisdiction were raised and the Superior Court confirmed that article 36 of the Québec Act Respecting Occupational Health and Safety2 (the “Act”) is not applicable to businesses under federal jurisdiction ...

Lavery Lawyers | May 2006

On February 2, 2006, the Quebec Court of Appeal rendered an interesting judgement involving directors’ liabilities in the case of Johnson and Marcil v. André Arthur et al (500-09-012808-028), a lawsuit for slander ...

Lavery Lawyers | June 2013

Recently, the Court of Québec reminded merchants of their responsibility to ensure that consumers are cognizant of important contractual clauses at the time a contract is entered into. In the case of 159191 Canada inc. (Discount Location d’autos et camions) c. Waddell1, the Court had to decide whether a clause in a two-page vehicle rental contract which excluded insurance coverage in a specific situation was valid under Québec law.  FACTSThe facts of the case are as follows ...

Lavery Lawyers | April 2006

In a judgment rendered on February 7, 2006, the Quebec Court of Appeal reiterated the obligations of the employer and the employee to play a role in seeking a reasonable accommodation. In cases where a collective agreement exists, the union has the same obligation ...

Lavery Lawyers | October 2021

An employer grievance is a means that employers can use to obtain compensation for material damages caused by pressure tactics or to recover overpayments resulting from a union? S wrongdoing. Such a recourse can also be filed to claim damages and legal fees from a union that has abused the grievance arbitration process, in particular by raising grounds that are unfounded or filing applications that are dilatory, or doing either in bad faith ...

Lavery Lawyers | June 2005

On May 20, 2005, the Supreme Court issued its judgment in the Smith & Nephew Inc. v. Louise Glegg and Christopher Carter and Gilles Dextradeur v. Louise Glegg cases1 ...

Lavery Lawyers | October 2013

On October 17th, 2013, the Supreme Court of Canada released its long-awaited decision in Castonguay Blasting, commonly referred to as the fly-rock case. To summarize, Castonguay was doing some blasting work and rock was unexpectedly projected outside the work site, landing on someone’s property and damaging a home and a vehicle. No one was hurt and there was no environmental damage ...

Lavery Lawyers | December 2009

THE CONFIDENTIALITY AGREEMENT, CAN YOU LIVE WITHOUT IT?Patrice André [email protected] are advising a client who is selling his business. The parties have already signed a letter of intent that provides for a due diligence review to be conducted in respect of your client’s business ...

Lavery Lawyers | October 2021

Bill 64, also known as the Act to modernize legislative provisions as regards the protection of personal information , was adopted on September 21, 2021, by the National Assembly of Quebec ...

Lavery Lawyers | June 2021

On Thursday, May 27, 2021, article 2503 of the Civil Code of Québec was amended as part of the adoption of Bill 82, titled An Act respecting mainly the implementation of certain provisions of the budget speech of 10 March 2020, which we had discussedin a publication last December ...

Lavery Lawyers | August 2016

Consent to End-of-Life Care Article 11 of the Civil Code of Québec1 states that no one can be made to undergo care without his consent. The Act respecting end-of-life care2 ("the Act"), passed by the National Assembly of Québec, came into force on December 15, 2015. Since that date, a person can give or refuse consent to specific forms of end-of-life care, provided he has given advance medical directives ("AMDs") for that purpose ...

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